Morning Links: World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims & anti-Vision Zero NoHo road widening

Los Angeles Walks invites you to join them for the World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims this Sunday, hosted by their project SoCal Families for Safe Streets.

Especially if you’ve impacted by dangerous street design and reckless driving in Southern California.

This Sunday, November 18, more than 100 family members, survivors, and allies will stand in solidarity.

We will remember the thousands of lives lost and forever changed in preventable traffic collisions across Greater Los Angeles. Join us. 

Stand with Dr. Debbie Hsiung, who witnessed the death of her 7 year-old son Aidan Tam on May 31, 2014, while her family legally crossed the street in Pasadena. Dr. Hsiung went on to co-found SoCal Families for Safe Streets, a project of Los Angeles Walks.

SoCal Families for Safe Streets members bear witness to their pain and suffering in order to end preventable deaths and severe injuries on our streets.

Together the group will mark World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims on Sunday, November 18 from 3pm-5pm at LA State Historic Park. RSVP now. 

Streets Have Stories

In addition to participating in ceremonies that honor lives lost or forever changed by preventable traffic collisions, we invite you to share your story this Sunday with Monique López of Pueblo Planning, who will be on hand recording experiences.

Every 7 hours someone is killed or severely injured on LA city streets.

Thousands of people throughout our region live with the pain of a sudden, traumatic loss or a life-altering injury. But their experiences — the stories of people most directly impacted by dangerous street design and reckless driving — go unheard.

Join SoCal Families for Safe Streets on Sunday, November 18 at World Day of Remembrance for Road Traffic Victims to record your story.

Through your story, you will help to shift our cultural understanding of traffic and street safety in Los Angeles and push for change.  

Please join us. RSVP today.

With gratitude, 
Los Angeles Walks

Besides, they’ll have s’mores.

………

Local

LA Councilmember Joe Buscaino has proposed lifting a ban bicycles, scooters and inline skates at the city’s 25 skate parks.

CiclaValley urges you to attend Monday’s meeting to discuss LADOT’s dangerous anti-Vision Zero plan to add more traffic lanes to Magnolia Blvd in North Hollywood.

A Vermont newspaper posts an obituary of Burlington native Leslie Pray, who was allegedly murdered by a Claremont motorist while riding her bike earlier this month.

Over 60 people in Long Beach have something else to be grateful for, after the city gave out 62 refurbished bicycles donated by residents yesterday.

 

State

Nice program in Riverside, where city officials are working with Ride 2 Recovery to give bicycles confiscated by police to veterans, saying it can literally save a life by giving them a way to get to the doctor or cope with PTSD.

Highland proposes pedestrian and bike safety improvements along a key bridge, including street lights and bicycle signal detection zones, with a possible Class 1 bike path to be added later.

A new study says completing the bike path along San Francisco’s 82-year old Bay Bridge would offer spectacular views, for a spectacular price — as high as $429 million.

 

National

The Design Museum of Chicago commissioned 17 original pieces of bike art for a new exhibition opening this week. Thanks to Fred Davis for the heads-up.

East Coast newspaper readers say reckless bike riders need to get off the sidewalk and follow the rules of the road. If you want to get bikes off the sidewalk, just give people safe places to ride on or off the street.

An Op-Ed in the Boston Globe says the streets need to be made safer — now. Meanwhile, the paper calls for requiring side guards on trucks to keep bike riders and pedestrians from getting caught underneath. If side guards were required in California, Frank Guzman would probably still be alive.

An MIT PhD candidate quits school and takes a nice, quiet 6,000-mile bike ride along China’s Silk Road. And writes a book about it.

New York improves access to the city’s Williamsburg Bridge by installing a protected bike lane, in advance of next year’s shutdown of a key subway line. However, Gothamist says the new bike lane has a potentially dangerous flaw.

After a Virginia man killed a bike rider and fled the scene in his work truck, his boss had the truck repaired to hide the evidence; now they both face criminal charges.

A Charleston SC newspaper says cars shouldn’t be the only way to get around the city, and that focusing on them makes it more dangerous for everyone else.

 

International

Cycling Weekly discusses the four stages that come after having your bike stolen.

A writer for Treehugger learns to give her bicycle a tune-up at a bicycle collective — aka bike co-op — in just a couple hours. And rides off for just $15.

Bolivia’s Death Road lived down to its name when a 22-year old Israeli woman was killed after a 440-pound rock fell onto a mountain bike tour.

London’s Evening Standard looks at five plans to cut toxic air and traffic deaths, including making deliveries from a train station by e-cargo bike and building safer trucks to protect people on foot and on bikes.

Paris considers banning cars permanently.

A Pakistani cycling coach says too many people think of a bicycle as a poor person’s transport, rather than a healthy way of life.

An Aukland, New Zealand columnist questions why bicycles provide such a “flamethrower of fury,” saying just relax a few years and you’ll love what the city is becoming.

An Australian newspaper considers the myth around riding single file, saying most drivers consider riding two abreast illegal and dangerous — and it’s actually just the opposite.

The Aussie edition of Bicycling provides ten tips on how to get more out of Strava.

 

Competitive Cycling

You won’t be seeing Portuguese cyclist in the pro peloton anytime soon, following his four year ban for doping with EPO before the 2017 Tour de France.

 

Finally…

Bikes really are the new golf — and beat running, too. Who needs earbuds when your helmet has built-in bluetooth bone-conduction speakers?

And seriously, who doesn’t need a bicycle jacket that turns into a sleeping bag?

 

2 comments

  1. Andy says:

    I’m pretty sure most drivers don’t consider riding single file illegal and dangerous.

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