Tag Archive for bike theft

BOLO Alert: New Linus bike stolen from Lincoln Blvd Ralph’s in Santa Monica

More bad news from the Venice – Santa Monica area.

Kaitlin Kolvet reports her brand new Linus bike was stolen on Monday from the Ralph’s market in Santa Monica, 910 Lincoln Blvd.

The three-speed bicycle was attached to the bike rack by just the front wheel when she went into the market around 5:20 pm; when she returned, only the front wheel and lock remained.

  • Less than 10 days old Linus Roadster Sport (3 speed)
  • Color: Marine
  • Serial Number: L4E0301489
  • Purchased at the Abbott Kinney Venice Location
If you see the bike, contact the LAPD Pacific Division, then email Kaitlin at kaitlinshay@gmail.com. Such a nice new bike should be easy to spot.
Screen Shot 2014-10-28 at 7.08.30 PM

BOLO Alert: Three bikes stolen from Venice garage on Wednesday

I’ve just gotten word of yet another set of bikes stolen from a garage, this time in Venice.

John Montgomery reports he had three bikes stolen overnight, even though they were locked to the wall.

On October 29th, three bikes were stolen out of my garage. They were actually locked to rings on the wall — and the cuts were clean so it looks like some bike thief pros. The CAADX was less than a week old (and I was really loving it).

Two of the bikes are pictured here, along with a reference photo of the Dolce Apex. I’d appreciate any heads up if you happen to come across one of them on the market. You can reach me via email: johnmont (at) fxguide.com

Details as to the makes/models:

56cm Scott CR1 Team (Black & Red) with  HED JET 4 Wheels 

(Serial Number TBD — docs are back in Chicago)

51cm Cannondale CAADX 105 (Black and White)

Serial Number EM33381

50cm Specialized Dolce Apex (White & Green) 

Serial Number WSBC 602 059 086F

bikes

special

 

Keep your eyes open and contact the LAPD Pacific Division if you see something matching these descriptions for sale anywhere, and email John at the address above.

Morning Links: Record your bike’s serial number, cycling helps keep you safe during surgery, LACBC needs new ED

Good advice from Lifehacker, as they say to always keep your bike’s serial number handy in case of theft.

My suggestion is to take photos of your bike and the serial number with your cell phone, then email them to your yourself. That way, you’ll have copies in multiple places so you won’t lose or accidently delete them. And having a photo eliminates any risk of transcribing errors.

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There are countless benefits to bicycling. But who knew one of them is that riders and walkers are five times less likely to die during surgery?

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Local

Have experience leading a nonprofit? The Los Angeles County Bicycle Coalition is looking for a skilled new Executive Director (pdf), as well as a part-time bookkeeper (pdf). A great opportunity to help build SoCal’s leading bike organization into one of the nation’s top bike advocacy groups.

Speaking of the LACBC, they’re hosting the first ever Firefly Ball at the end of this month to benefit the coalition and honor civic leaders who help make the city more bike friendly.

The Santa Monica Bike Center won this summer’s National Bike Challenge.

SaMo will host a Halloween themed Kidical Mass on Saturday, the 25th.

Kross-tober Fest brings cyclocross to Long Beach this Sunday.

 

State

A new two-mile bike path opens in La Mirada, part of a planned 66-mile loop around Orange County.

Palm Springs hosts a Cycledelic bike festival this Thursday to celebrate new bike lanes, a bike corral and Bike Fix-it station.

San Bernardino police are out on bike patrol, which proves popular with the public.

A bike rider was killed after being hit by several cars while riding salmon in the traffic lane on I-80 in Vacaville; no word on why he was on the highway, let alone riding the wrong way in traffic.

Cars will be banned from San Francisco’s lower Market Street by 2017, which will eventually feature raised cycle tracks. But why do you need a raised bikeway if there won’t be any cars?

 

National

Bike Radar offers five tips for beginning riders to avoid ruining a big bike ride.

Three Portland road diets prevent 37 crashes a year at a cost of just $500,000.

Bryce Canyon National Park plans a possible eight mile bike and pedestrian path.

Kansas get its first protected bike lane.

Shameful. An NYPD police investigation shows a bus driver failed to yield when he left crossed a cyclist, leaving a Swedish model brain dead. Yet he walks away without charges, while she doesn’t. And never will.

Take note LA: A New York Streetsblog report says implementing the city’s Vision Zero plan will require a major culture change, as the previous item makes painfully clear.

Ooh, scary. Philadelphia’s new bike vigilante is taking on scofflaw riders by posting posters.

 

International

A British cyclist is knocked off his bike with a piece of wood and punched repeatedly by two men before they ran off; no word on whether it was a robbery attempt, random violence or if they knew the victim.

Evidently, a British town has decided bikes are more dangerous than cars, as they inexplicably ban bicycles from the town center 24 hours a day, but allow cars for 12.

A French driver is charged with deliberately running over a cyclist and fleeing the scene following a dispute in Barcelona.

Newsweek discovers people in Copenhagen ride bikes, and cities around the world are trying to copy their success.

Bike advocates dismiss planned upgrades to Brisbane roads as mere window dressing.

An Aussie advocate says the bike versus car attitude has to stop.

 

Finally…

No, seriously. If you’ve got a bag full of meth hidden in your bike’s handlebars, put a damn light on it already. Turns out New York’s bike riding Senator Schumer takes calls while he’s riding, but will only stop riding if it’s from the president.

And a livid writer for the Daily Mail sputters that lycra louts must have license plates.

 

BOLO Alert: Bike stolen in Torrance, thief caught on surveillance camera

It’s not every day a bike thief is caught in the act.

On camera, anyway.

Allison writes to report that her classic mixte bike was stolen sometime around 3 am on Thursday, October 2nd from an apartment building on the 4200 block of Artesia Blvd in Torrance.

The bike is described as having a rusty blue ladies steel frame with front and rear fenders; the rear fender is attached with a zip tie at the bottom bracket.

The 3-speed Sturmey Archer AW hub is dated 1965, while the tires are brand new Schwalbs. Front brakes are original with orange Kool Stop pads; back brakes are Tektro with black pads.

Cables are threaded through a metal headlight attachment on the front tube. The front brake cable is original white; rear bra­ke and shifter cables are black. The rear brake cable is installed upside down for this model, and loops between the down-tube and seat post as shown.

The serial number is 2339655, and can be found on back of seat post. A Zefal HPx1 frame pump was attached to the bike and is also missing.

The thief was caught by security camera; a still from the video shows a dark haired man with a long ponytail.

Torrance bike thief

Anyone having information on the identity of this man or whereabouts of the bicycle is urged to contact the Torrance Police department at 310/328-3456, reference Case ID 1400-60347. Then call Allison at 818/850-2710.

She reports that two other bikes were stolen from her apartment complex in just the last few weeks.

Let’s hope someone can identify this guy and help put a bike thief behind bars where he belongs. And let’s get Allison her bike back.

Allison's stolen bike 2

Allison's stolen bike

Weekend Links: Three LA riders shot, one killed in separate attacks; Mad Men producer will bike to Emmys

Be careful waiting for transit late at night.

An Eastside bike rider was shot and robbed of his cruiser bike early Friday at the Metro Station on the 200 block of Indiana Street. Police are looking for a man and a woman.

Then again, let this be a reminder to always be aware of your surroundings, especially when you’re alone at night.

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According to the LA Times, two motorized bike riders were shot in South LA Saturday evening; sadly, one of the victims, a man in his 30s who has not been publicly identified, was pronounced dead at a local hospital.

The reason for the shooting is unknown. A report on KABC-7, not yet available as this goes online, says it did not appear to be gang related.

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For the first time in my knowledge, a nominee for a major Hollywood award will arrive by bike, as Mad Men writer/producer Tom Smuts will ride 15-miles from his Santa Monica home to Monday’s Emmy Awards at Downtown’s LA Live. He’ll be riding with a group of fellow attendees on a route designed with help from the LACBC.

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Barring catastrophe, Teejay van Garderen wrapped up his second consecutive victory in Colorado’s USA Pro Challenge by setting a new course record in the individual time trial. Uphill. And in the rain.

As the Pro Challenge wraps up, the Vuelta a España kicks off; Bicycling tells you who to watch.

And speaking of which, Helen’s Cycles is sponsoring a Vuelta Challenge Party on Saturday, September 6th; the same day, they’re also holding a group ride for intermediate to advanced cyclists.

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Local

Streetsblog’s Damien Newton takes councilmember Gil Cedillo to task for honoring an 84-year old Korean War vet killed while crossing North Figueroa, despite killing the street safety improvements that might have prevented his death. Meanwhile, Orange 20 says when Cedillo won, LA lost.

Original LA bike advocate and recent father Joe Linton offers advice on when, where and why to bike or walk with a baby.

The final Crank Mob ride rolls on Saturday, September 20th with The Last Crankmass.

Beverly Hills may be the Biking Black Hole, but their police take distracted driving seriously, at least for a day.

Maybe things are finally getting better for cyclists in the San Gabriel Valley, as both Pasadena and San Gabriel pursue robust bike plans.

 

State

A podcast interviews LA ultra-distance rider and Furnace Creek 508 and Badwater 135 producer Chris Kostman.

OC riders are invited to meetings on Tuesday and Wednesday in Seal Beach and Fullerton, respectively, to discuss a proposed 66-mile bikeway loop through the county.

A San Diego ninja cyclist was injured in a collision early Friday morning, yet a local TV station somehow considers his lack of a helmet to be the most important detail.

Oakland looks to improve safety for bike riders and pedestrians.

 

National

NPR responds to complaints that a recent story about LA Bike Trains incited violence against cyclists.

Bicycling’s Elly Blue goes in search of her five-figure bike.

Bike lawyer Bob Mionske offers advice on what to do if you’re hit by a car in Oregon; the same advice holds true just about anywhere.

Evidently, bike thieves will steal anything, as vandals strip Washington’s famous bike in a tree.

Local business people freak out over a new road diet and parking protected bike lanes in Salt Lake City.

A Nashville writer asks if we can all share the roads without someone ending up in the hospital. Good question.

New York firefighters rescue a salmon cyclist and her adorable puppy after her bike is hit by a sanitation truck.

If you think it’s hard riding in DC now, imagine what it was like in 1982.

 

International

New British study shows riding to work really does make you thinner. Then again, so does taking public transport.

Scary. A 96-year old UK woman apologizes for killing a cyclist and seriously injuring the victim’s husband — even though she can’t remember the crash.

An Irish cyclist rides 8,700 miles from Dublin to Beijing.

Tragically, 20-year old Dutch mountain biker Annefleur Kalvenhaar was killed after falling in a qualifying race for the UCI World Cup.

Instead of focusing on making the streets safer, Aussie police bust 76 cyclists for riding without helmets.

 

Finally…

A rare triple caught on video: The top 10 epic fails of drunken Russian bike riders. Cam Zink successfully lands a 100 foot mountain bike backflip. And a Polish cyclist hits a hidden pothole and does a faceplant in a major puddle; then again, if this is the worst day of his life, as the headline suggests, he must be having a pretty good one.

 

BOLO Alert: Trek hybrid stolen in Hollywood area; advice on what to do if your bike is stolen

One thing you can always count on here in LA. No matter where you park your bike, there’s potential thief nearby looking for an opportunity to take it.

Antonio Fernandez learned that the hard way yesterday when his bike was stolen from the hallway of his Hollywood apartment building. The theft most likely occurred sometime late Thursday night or early Friday morning near the intersection of Sunset Blvd and North Poinsettia.

The bike is described as a blue Trek hybrid, year and model unknown, with flat handlebars. The one clear distinguishing feature is a University of Indiana registration stick on the seat tube; not many bikes here in Los Angeles will have that.

If you see the bike, call the LAPD Hollywood Division at 213/972-2971, then email me or leave a comment here and I’ll forward it to Fernandez. Or you can reach him via Twitter @anfed.

Fernandez-bike-1

Fernandez-bike-2

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I’m often asked what to do if your bike gets stolen.

1. Always be prepared by keeping records of all pertinent information, including year, make and model of your bike, serial number and any distinguishing features. I recommend keeping current photos of your bike — including a photo of the serial number — on both your computer and your cell phone. And consider signing up with a bicycle registration service, like Bike Shepherd or the National Bike Registry.

2. Once you discover your bike is stolen, contact the police and file a report. Sometimes they will try to discourage you from filing a theft report, but insist on it. Then send me the details, and I’ll list your bike here.

3. Contact your insurance agent. If you have homeowners or renters insurance, your bike should be covered if the value exceed the deductible.

4. Start scouring Craigslist, eBay and the Penny Saver for any bike that matches the description. And look at other nearby areas; thieves will often move a hot bike out of the area where it’s less likely to be recognized.

5. Visit any local bike shops in the area and ask them to be on the lookout for your bike. Thieves will often take a stolen bike into a shop for repairs or try to sell it.

6. Check out garage sales and street vendors in the area, and keep an eye open for anyone who may be riding your bike or park it on the street. If you see it, call the police and let them deal with it. While there are many stories of people who’ve recovered their own bikes, there are just as many of people who’ve gotten in over their heads; getting your bike back isn’t worth risking your own safety.

 

Guest post: South Bay cyclist brings down a prolific bike thief. And pays a cool grand for the privilege.

A happy ending to a long tale of a stolen bicycle; photo by Mike Bike.

A happy ending to a long tale of a stolen bicycle; photo by Mike Bike.

Last week I stumbled on a couple of news stories with an unusual twist.

According to stories in the Daily Breeze and Easy Reader News, a Redondo Beach man had been arrested for stealing a number of bikes from garages in Redondo and Manhattan Beach.

I don’t think anyone would complain about getting a bike thief off the streets.

But the interesting thing was the way the thief was uncovered, when a man simply walked into the Redondo Beach Police station and told them he’d bought a hot bike.

It seemed like there must be more to the story.

And there was.

The next day, I found an email in my inbox from South Bay cyclist Mike Bike, who identified himself as the man in question. And offered a detailed explanation of his role in the convoluted tale.

Yes, it’s a long read. But it’s a great story, and well worth the time.

And fair warning to anyone tempted to buy a bike of questionable provenance.

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Caveat Emptor

Strange day today. Very strange, indeed.

It started out so well. Jane and I are training for a couple of tours at the end of the month and we had been frustrated trying to get her new bike to fit her. Today’s ride was going very well, though, after we finally got it dialed in: up the west side and back to the South Bay where we’d finish up the long weekend with this long ride.

Then it got weird. But let’s go back a ways.

A month ago we’d started training in earnest after Jane’s school year ended. We had done a serious climbing day up on the hill. We were headed home and Jane was in a hurry because she had some prep to do for a summer class. As we passed ‘the corner,’ I saw some bikes chained to sign posts on the right side. One of them caught my eye because it was a small women’s frame. The issue with Jane’s bike was that it’s a 52cm men’s frame that we thought was just a tad long in the top tube and with the standard diamond frame didn’t give her much stand-over clearance. I pulled over but Jane kept going. It turned out the guy selling the bikes was strolling up to show it to some other guy who just came there and must have called (both bikes had hand-written signs with a phone number). I asked the guy “how much for the Specialized?” He said he had checked on Craigslist and it was worth a lot and he’d have to get $1000 for it. It was a new looking Specialized carbon fiber WSD with Shimano stuff on it. Nothing looked abused. It had eggbeater pedals on it. I told him I was in the market for something like this but that my girlfriend had just ridden by. I wanted her to look at it and test ride. I jotted down the phone and model stuff and left him there.

Jane was interested. She thought it would be worthwhile to look at a bike just a mile from the house. So I collected my mad money, $700, and got in the van to go look. We brought her pedals and a pedal wrench and Allen keys to make it a little better for a test ride. We called ‘The Guy’ and he came on out from somewhere. I asked if I could swap pedals and he said, “sure.” We chatted a bit and he said he rode regularly up on the hill. He had bought the bike for his wife and she loved it but they were forced to move since his dad was dying of cancer in New Jersey. He was moving back there to take care of him and they needed to get rid of stuff. I could sympathize with that. Jane came back from her spin and said she liked it. I told ‘The Guy’ that I only had $700 or so on me, could he take less? He said he needed the grand. I told him I could go to the ATM down the street. Jane stayed and I went to the ATM. I came back and gave him the cash and we did the deal. I asked about cleats for those pedals; he said they had never bought those. His wife only rode it a few times and he had bought the bike like that used, with the pedals. OK, I was a little suspicious; but it was a plausible story.

After a week off for travel, we got on it in the middle of June. It was clear that the stem was too low. On a ride back from the hill, we saw ‘The Guy’ out by still more bikes for sale. We stopped and told him that we were really pleased with the bike but were still dialing it in. Jane asked about these two ‘new’ bikes; He said they had found two more stashed in the back of the garage. We rode away thinking that things weren’t as plausible as they were earlier. As for the stem, I thought it was an 80 mm but it was actually a 60. It turned out a friend at work had an adjustable stem he wasn’t using. And he wanted the pedals so we made a swap.

I did the wrenching and things were better but she was still cramped and getting a sore back. She wanted the seat further back. We moved it as much as possible but she wanted more. I was thinking we bought the wrong size bike. I looked at set-back posts but thought maybe one of my other posts could yield a cm or so. I swapped to a different post with a little more space but it was not enough. Looking at the bike, it was obvious that the bars should be moved forward if she wanted more space. My work friend had an array of stems and he was pleased with his pedal deal so he agreed to lend me all his OS stems. Over two rides we eventually gravitated to the longest of the lot, a 120 mm. We were even able to switch back to the original post.

In the mean time I had purchased side loading bottle cages due to the extreme smallness of this little compact frame, along with a new top-tube bag and seat bag. We had her Garmin on there and a new bell (which didn’t fit so well on the OS bars but I rigged it with a zip tie). Saturday night she declared it finally dialed and she looked at the tour profile and said “We need to do 71 miles tomorrow.” A quick calculation showed the west side run with a trip to Hawthorne would do it. The hot weather would help with heat conditioning though the breeze kept us from getting too hot.

Sunday morning we got underway about quarter to eight. We turned at the plaza and headed north along the coast, and were going much better than other recent rides because the bike was finally dialed. What a difference! Jane held my wheel while I kept an eye on her with my relatively new helmet-mounted rear-view (really nice unit: http://www.safezonemirror.com/install/). Great day.

Coming back, we rode the beach south taking our time through the crowds. Then we rode by the plaza on our way to completing the 71 miles. I did the mental math and it looked like we were right on target. Go to Hawthorne, hit Trader Joes for some cold drinks and then home.

Then it got weird. As we crested PV West I noticed a small female rider on a bike that looked too large for her; she was rocking her pelvis on the saddle and just looked awkward. I passed her and didn’t say anything. I looked back and Jane was off my wheel a bit then I heard the ladies talking. I got to the overlook and pulled off thinking I might give the lady advice. They both pulled up and I thought I heard the lady ask how long Jane had been riding. I told her about 5 years. She looked displeased. It became apparent she was interested in the bike and wanted to know how long we had it. I said we bought it used about a month ago. She said “that’s my bike!” Well, what do you say to that?

She said it was stolen from her house nearby a little over a month earlier along with other items and she had resorted to riding her old bike which had been re-fitted for a daughter (she did not wrench). Then she started obsessing. I asked her about the stuff I had replaced, could she tell me what the original equipment looked like? She could not. But she claimed she had the police report and the serial number in her phone.

The serial numbers matched. Crap. I bought a stolen bike for cash. But I still had the guy’s phone number and I had seen still more bikes at the lot on Friday.

The lady insisted she wanted her bike back right there. I said that we were out on a ride and I understood it was her bike but could we please finish our ride and we’d give it back with the original equipment on it (provided I could trade back to get the pedals!). She wasn’t buying it. She wanted the cops. We agreed, police were needed to resolve this, but she had no idea where she was. I helped her out giving her reasonable instructions on our location (you say Paseo and PV West and it could be about 5 different places). She kept insisting that I should have known the bike was stolen and I should have checked the stolen bike data bases before purchasing. Maybe so, but I’ve been stymied too many times trying to buy well-priced used merchandise on web-sites that I tend to move quickly.

The cops arrived and at first wanted to know who the perp was. Thank goodness they didn’t draw weapons or cuff us. We explained the situation several times to several officers and since the numbers matched (and they checked the report online) they said the lady needs to have her bke. I asked again if we could please finish up our ride and we’d get the bike restored and returned; they said no. They said we should remove our stuff from the bike and they’d impound it.

Fortunately, I had spotted Greg (another guy who’s ridden with us many times and done construction work for us) parked nearby. I went over and he had just finished his ride and I explained some of what was going down. So with Greg’s pedal wrench and my multi-tool, I started taking off pedals, stem, bags, computer, and bell; leaving the bars dangling by the cables. The lady exclaimed “are you going to let that asshole take parts off my bike?” The cops said, yes, they were my parts so I could have them. I explained yet again that I would make the bike whole and I really wanted to finish the ride but if you are going to be like this, this is how it will be done. So Greg loaded up our stuff in his truck, the cops carted the stolen bike off in the back of the police cruiser and I was left to ride home. I passed the lady on the ill-fitting bike and waved. She had my phone number and address and would stop by to let me fix the bike later.

I thought it couldn’t get any stranger. I started mulling over a visit to the roadside bike sales lot to chat with ‘The Guy’; but what to say? Basically, the lady was going to be more-or-less whole; but I was out $1000 and the PV cops had no interest in helping me. At least they didn’t shoot me! Down the hill I went. What to do next. I had to get the pedals back; shouldn’t be a problem. I had to talk to more cops in the south bay; never much fun talking to cops. I turned and headed toward home. I was mulling things over as I crossed an intersection. Someone yelled from a car window “Hey, I’ve been looking for you!” I looked over and there’s the guy! He pulled a left turn and parked the wrong way behind me.

He says his buddy just came up with a high-end bike and he thought I might be interested. A month later and he recognizes me!?! In any case, here he was saying he wants to talk to me I said, yeah, I’m real interested. His wife was in the passenger seat and she offered to take my phone number again since he didn’t have it anymore. He remembered that he sold us the Specialized and that we’d stopped to say how much we liked it. I asked him, again, where did you get that. He said it was his wife’s and said “where’d we get that, honey? Was it Huntington?” She said it was. I asked about how his dad was doing. He said “it is what it is.” Very profound. I was less sympathetic this time. He said “Yeah, we’re leaving in a couple of weeks.” Then they drove up a side street as I noted their vehicle license and make and color. Tres bizarre.

I got home and Jane wasn’t home yet, so I called her. Greg had to drop some stuff at Ray’s house. They were just looking at bikes at ‘the lot’. I told them to forget that; I was going to get a call from him this afternoon to see a bike. They drove to our street. We talked it over and decided first things first, get the pedals. Then the bike lady called and said she had the bike and was stopping by. I said I had the stem but no pedals yet but I’d get them. After 45 minutes and a trip for pedals, she was set. I went back home and we contemplated our next move. No call from ‘The Guy’ so I called the local cops. Cops on the phone don’t really want to chat so I said I’d stop by the station.

Jane and I went down and after some screening at the front desk and sitting on their hard bench, got to talk with first one officer and then a pair. They seemed somewhat disinterested in my bizarre tale; maybe because it sounded like I made it up. But they took down all the info I had: stolen bike police report number, phone number for ‘The Guy,’ plate number, description and times. Then they told me I was SOL; that I was lucky I wasn’t arrested for possession of stolen goods! I thanked them for their compassion and we left figuring ‘The Guy’ was going to have a long career as a salesman.

We cleaned up and decided to go out for dinner with Jane’s daughter. We ended up driving by the sales lot. The bikes that I’d seen earlier were gone. Crap, maybe he’d gotten wise and pulled up stakes after my questions. Then I glanced right and saw a police car parked. Hey, I said, half in jest, maybe they’re visiting my friend. Jane’s daughter said it wasn’t one car but two. We went to dinner and talked about the day.

After dinner and some shopping, we drove back by the place. Wow! Now there were four police cars and a police pick-up truck! And it was loaded to the gills with bikes! Holy crap; not in my wildest dreams did I expect that outcome. We pulled around the corner and parked and got out with cell phone cameras ready. We chatted with the official looking officer on the front steps. He indicated that they took the guy down and he was a major operator. He had been carted away and would spend the night in jail. Wow. Then the two officers from the PD visit emerged with big smiles. They thanked me and said it had been a big help. I told them that ‘the Guy’ hadn’t called me back. I got the police report number so I could cite it for my income tax loss; that’s about the only way I’m going to recoup any monetary benefit on this one. Small claims court seems a long shot. No offense, but I’m not a fan of courts, lawyers or law enforcement. But I’ll give them kudos on this one.

I sent a text message with the pick-up full of bikes to the bike lady. She called back to say she was very excited and glad they got ‘the Guy’.

Reflecting on it now; it was one very strange day. Jane has got a new Specialized from a local dealer; costs more but nobody is going to stuff it in the back of a police car in the middle of our ride.

Oh, and if you’ve lost a bike to theft in the south bay, contact the Police department, (310) 802-5124.

Don’t expect sympathy.

BOLO Alert: Scattante bike stolen from Fairfax District

I’ve just gotten word that a bike was stolen from a garage in the Fairfax District sometime in the last few days.

The bike is a black Scattante R330 — most likely a 2010 model — with two bottle holders and a saddle bag with tools, serial number SI CF J10 F01180.

The bike was stolen from a shared garage on the alley between Orange Grove and Fairfax Avenues, and Oakwood and Rosewood. The theft was discovered Thursday morning, and occurred sometime between then and the previous Sunday.

If you see the bike, call the LAPD Hollywood station at 213/972-2971, then email the owner in care of SButensky@aol.com.

Stolen Scattante

BOLO Alert: Motobecane Fantom CX stolen in Culver City

I’ve just gotten word that a bike was stolen in Culver City. Here are the details from the owner’s Craigslist post:

  • Motobecane Fantom CX Cyclocross Bicycle
  • 61cm (for a taller rider)
  • Dark Gray
  • Salsa Drop Bars (Flipped)
  • Shimano Ultegra STI Shifters, Derailleurs, Crank
  • Baby Blue Look Clipless pedals
  • Black Fenders
  • Brass Bell

If you see it, contact the Culver City Police Department at 310/837-1221, and email the owner through the Craigslist post above.

The bike belongs to the husband of the long-popular LA Cycle Chic blog. So let’s all keep an eye out and see if we can get it back for them.

Motobecane-1

Motobecane-2

 

BOLO Alert — bike stolen in front of HMS Bounty in Koreatown

Kapoor Stolen Bike

This is the bike that was stolen.

Sometimes even a U-lock isn’t enough.

The LAPD recently reported that bike theft is one of the few crimes that continues to increase in the face of falling crime rates in Los Angeles — as much as 200% in some areas in recent years.

Something Daveed Kapoor found out the hard way, despite doing everything right to secure his bike.

I’ll let him tell the story.

Monday night at 6:30pm I locked my bike to the LADOT inverted U-rack on Wilshire just west of Kenmore, as indicated in the photo. It was dark but in front of the Gaylord Apts entrance with fair amount of foot traffic, didn’t seem risky at all. I used my Kryptonite Evolution U-lock locked through the frame and rear wheel. This is my everyday city bike that I use to get everywhere all over LA.  For 3 years I’ve been u-locking it on Central LA streets and never had a problem. I weigh 210 pounds, I kept breaking my wheels so a couple years ago I bought Aerospoke wheels, which are super heavy but don’t need to be trued. The wheels are attractive to thieves, so I use Pitlock locking skewers, which take are very theft proof, but can be removed using vice grips or a hammer and a wedge, and a lot of time. But in 3 years biking in LA almost every day I have never had a problem before.

When I came out of the Bounty two hours later at 8:30 pm, all that was left was my sawed-through U-lock in two pieces. Looks like a clean cut, I suspect they used an angle grinder. I’m guessing it was one of these van bike theft units that parks the van in front of the bike, cuts the lock off and quickly throws the bike in the van. But who knows…

Where the bike was stolen; even a busy, well-lit street isn't always enough.

Where the bike was stolen; even a busy, well-lit street isn’t always enough.

He offers a good description of the bike and accessories, which should make it easy to identify if the thief tries to sell it intact or brings it into a bike shop.

  • Bike was black 2010 GT Tachyon 3.0, 24 speed
  • Pitlock Skewers
  • Schwalbe Marathon Tires
  • Black Aerospoke Wheels
  • ISM Adamo Race Saddle
  • Rear Rack w/ Linus ‘Sac’ Saddle Bag – with Black Fiji Sweater + Oakley Clear Industrial M Frame
  • Glasses inside the bag
  • 2 Gotham Industries Defender Bike Lights locked to the handlebar
  • Light & Motion Vis 180 Rear Light
  • Green Giro Hex Helmet was locked thru the U lock, taken as well

Kapoor estimates the total value of the bike and accessories as around $2000, making the crime Grand Theft. And he notes that police were very polite and took the crime seriously when he filed his report, something that doesn’t always happen.

If you see the bike or find it listed for sale, call the LAPD at 877/ASK-LAPD (877/275-5273). Or if you see a bike theft in progress, call 911.

Meanwhile, the LAPD and local cycling organization CICLE offer advise on how to protect your bike from theft.

And homeowner’s and renter’s will usually cover your bike in the event of theft, even when you’re away from home. So check with your agent and make sure you’re covered — and that your deductible is low enough to to make it worth filing a claim if your bike is stolen.

Because as this case shows, you can do everything right and still lose your bike to a determined thief.

 

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