Tag Archive for cicLAvia

Great video captures the magic of CicLAvia, and your Morning Links

It’s not easy to capture the magic of CicLAvia.

But this short video from Maxwell Vann comes pretty close.

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Local

Richard Risemberg enjoys the afterglow of another successful CicLAvia.

Wolfpack Hustle brings back the Civic Center Crit this July.

A new Venice restaurant and bakery plans to deliver bread by bicycle to the local area.

The Ovarian Psychos go on a full moon ride this Tuesday; male-identifying riders need not apply.

Ride the 12th annual Cesar Chavez Pilgrimage with PValley Bike this Saturday.

 

State

A bill under consideration in the state legislature would allow public agencies other than police to provide bike safety classes in public schools. So anyone other than police teaching students bike safety now is breaking the law?

Teams are announced for the two days of women’s racing at this year’s Amgen Tour of California.

The overly named Newport Beach Bicycle Master Plan Oversight Committee agreed to study ways to improve safety on the city’s Back Bay Drive after the Newport Bay Conservancy suggests restricting bike use to improve safety, including making the street one-way for everyone. Needless to say, several cyclists spoke out against the proposal. Thanks to Lois for the heads-up.

Maybe Santa Ana really is committed to becoming bike friendly, as the city will close two miles of Main Street on Sunday, October 12th for Orange County’s first open streets event. It’s patterned after LA’s CicLAvia, which will take place the week before.

The 24th annual Sea Otter Classic kicks off today in Monterey with a small but strong women’s field; unfortunately, I’ll have to miss this one. Just like the other 23.

 

National

Yes, traffic fatalities are falling in the US, yet we continue to fall further behind other countries.

Even the nation’s largest motoring group gets it, as a new AAA study shows that voice activated email features are more distracting than hand-held cell phones.

Seriously? A 68-year old Wisconsin cyclist says I didn’t need any damn bike lanes, so you don’t either.

Something to look forward to as Slaying the Badger prepares to premier at New York’s Tribeca Film Festival; the movie relates the epic battle between teammates Greg LeMond and Bernard Hinault in the 1986 Tour de France.

After suffering four flats in three weeks, a Chattanooga cyclist calls on the city to maintain the streets, already.

A South Carolina woman faces charges for beating a bicyclist with a three-foot stick as he rode by. But rather than sidewalk rage, it turns out to be a case of long-delayed post-domestic violence.

Lance names names under oath, but doesn’t name any names we didn’t already know.

 

International

A UK rider uses his bike cam to catch scofflaw and otherwise not-so-smart cyclists.

A Belgian cycling official suggests issuing soccer-style yellow and red cards to enforce infractions in the peloton. Meanwhile, cycling boss Brian Cookson considers allowing bike cams in competition.

In yet another bizarre biking incident, an Aussie cyclist has to call the equivalent of 911 after a pickup driver cuts in front of him, and the collision tosses him into the truck’s bed. Pounding on the cab to get the driver’s attention just startled the man behind the wheel and caused him to keep going, as the rider stood in the back dialing his phone.

A Philippine cyclist calls on malls to stop discriminating against bike riders when he’s forced to park his bike outside in the rain while motorists are allowed to park inside.

The sidewalks of Tokyo may or may not be the place for cyclists.

 

Finally…

If you hit a pedestrian on an off-road trail — or anywhere else, for that matter — stop to make sure they’re okay and exchange contact and insurance information. Yes, failure to do so is hit-and-run, just like it would be if a driver hit you and took off. And yes, your liability coverage should pay for any injuries, assuming you have car insurance.

A double dose of Morning Links for your entertainment and edification.

There’s one advantage to breaking news getting in the way of Monday’s Morning Links. It means you get a double dose to help distract you from more meaningful pursuits on Tuesday.

To wit…

 

Local

Yet another successful CicLAvia goes down in the books; in less than four years it has become a tradition for some.

LAist learned 10 things from Sunday’s CicLAvia, while Streetsblog readers offer their thoughts.

Open Streets advocates from around the country look to CicLAvia for lessons learned.

Streetsblog’s Joe Linton looks at the new bicycle rumble strips on the LA River bike path.

UCLA offers 100 free show tickets for people who arrive on bike.

Tree experts from around the country take a 100 mile Pasadena bike tour.

Glendale police ticket over 50 drivers in a crackdown on handheld cell phones and texting while driving. Who do we write to thank them?

 

State

Leisure World residents confront a samurai sword-wielding bike rider.

Oceanside riders get a new, roughly one-third mile separated bike path. Call it a down payment on the planned 40+ mile route.

A 72-year old woman faces charges after seriously injuring a Rancho Bernardo bike rider in a drunken hit-and-run.

Redlands complete a successful 30th Bicycle Classic, while inspiring the next generation of riders. And maybe the one after that.

I see reports like this everyday. But seriously, who would run a stop sign when there’s a car right in front of you, like this woman in Blythe allegedly did?

An 18-year old bike rider suffers major injuries in a Santa Maria hit-and-run; the victim was in a crosswalk when the light turned green in the opposite direction.

Careless drivers and overly aggressive cyclists make a bad combination on Bay Area back roads.

A Santa Rosa cyclist dies in police custody after struggling with officers following a brief chase. Just a coincidence, I’m sure.

 

National

Looks like action cam maker Contour is back from the dead.

Apparently assuming the highway death count isn’t high enough, Apple is working on better ways to distract drivers.

Tucson cyclists want better road safety; they had their version of a ciclovia on Sunday, too.

Apparently, bike paths pose a risk to rural Wyoming residents.

Missouri Republican declares war on bicycle funding in the state budget.

Police attempt to encourage alternative transportation by cracking down on bicycling University of Illinois students as soon as the weather warms up. Yeah, that’ll get more people on bikes.

The rich get richer as Chicago gets another 15 miles of buffered bike lanes, and five miles of protected bike lanes.

Bike riding is getting safer in Ohio as bikes and cars are clashing less.

A Georgia writer correctly notes that children on bikes can’t be expected to ride responsibly, and it’s up to motorists to drive as if it’s their kids sharing the roads with them.

 

International

New British Brainy Bike Lights promise to make motorists recognize bikes a split second sooner.

Fabian Cancellara wins a third Tour of Flanders, while a fan is critically injured in a collision with a rider. Meanwhile, cycling scion Taylor Phinney continues to impress.

A Mumbai cyclist struggles to raise funds to compete in this year’s RAAM. Surely some American firm has saved enough by outsourcing their customer service and/or tech departments overseas to throw a few rupees his way.

A New Zealand panel will explore how to keep cyclists safer. Like not crashing into them, maybe?

 

Finally…

Repeat after me. When you’re carrying multiple baggies of meth, marijuana and assorted drug paraphernalia — and a key to a drug-filled locker — on your bike, don’t ride salmon. Seriously.

And it looks like the Militant Angeleno punked me us with his guide to the Wilshire CicLAvia. I really, really wanted to believe the one about the car cult.

Thanks to John Hall for his generous donation to help support this website and bring you LA’s best bike news everyday. If you’d like to help, you can contribute to BikinginLA through PayPal.

A brief look at Sunday’s successful, stress-free Wilshire CicLAvia

Let’s take a quick photographic tour of a few outstanding moments from Sunday’s CicLAvia on Wilshire Blvd.

Only in LA — Cyclists at the Fairfax hub get to ride the red carpet.

Only in LA — Cyclists at the Fairfax hub get to ride the red carpet.

Evidently, bikes really are good for business.

Evidently, bikes really are good for business.

A boy on a bike circles the moving memorial to Robert F. Kennedy in front of the former Ambassador Hotel.

A boy on a bike circles the moving memorial to Robert F. Kennedy in front of the former Ambassador Hotel.

A homeless man sleeping behind the memorial shows we still have a long way to go to live up to RFK's ideals.

A homeless man sleeping behind the memorial shows we still have a long way to go to live up to RFK’s ideals.

Long time LA residents might not recognize the new, pristine and junkie-free MacArthur park, where cakes no longer melt in the rain.

Long time LA residents might not recognize the new, pristine and junkie-free MacArthur park, where cakes no longer melt in the rain.

Just a small fraction of the crowd walking through the Dismount Zone at the DTLA hub.

Just a small fraction of the crowd walking through the Dismount Zone at the DTLA hub. And one guy riding anyway.

There were a lot of very cool ridden on the route. This classic Sting Ray reproduction was one of my favorites.

There were a lot of very cool ridden on the route. This classic Sting Ray reproduction was one of my favorites.

This was my first chance to ride the new Wilshire Blvd Bus — and bike — Only Lanes.

This was my first chance to ride the new Wilshire Blvd Bus — and bike — Only Lanes.

As promised, much of the architecture was beautiful. And too often unnoticed behind the wheel of a car.

As promised, much of the architecture was beautiful. And too often goes unnoticed from behind the wheel of a car.

 

This little guy was very winded after riding up a small hill. And deservedly very proud of what he'd accomplished.

This little guy was very winded after riding up a small hill. And deservedly very proud of what he’d accomplished.

Children and adults took advantage of the opportunity to add their artwork to this van.

Children and adults took advantage of the opportunity to add their artwork to this van.

One final reminder that bikes are good for business. And if restaurants and other business owners work for safe bike access. they'l be rewarded.

One final reminder that bikes are good for business. And if restaurants and other business owners work for safe bike access, they’l be rewarded.

……..

Just a few other notes.

Just like last year along the same route, this was one of the most relaxed of the eight CicLAvias I’ve attended.

This was also the first time I didn’t witness a single downed rider. That’s not to say no one was injured, but I saw a lot of very bored people in the First Aid booths.

There were a lot of very young children riding on training wheels and small bikes, which spoke volumes about how comfortable their parents felt in letting them ride. And sets the stage for a new generation of bike riders.

There were also more people walking than I’ve seen in years past. Maybe the message is finally getting out that CicLAvia is for everyone, regardless of how you choose to travel. As long as it’s without a motor.

Businesses that reached out to CicLAvia participants in some way were richly rewarded. Those that remained closed or ignored what was happening on the street in front of them were largely ignored in turn.

If bike riders had a safe way to get to those shops and restaurants, proprietors could enjoy a boost in business more than once a year.

Twelve miles an hour isn’t fast. Except when everyone else is doing eight. If you find yourself alone in weaving in and out of other bike traffic, you’re the problem. Note: In response to a comment from Chuck below, I am not suggesting any kind of speed limit for anyone. What I’m saying is that when the traffic around you slows down and bunches up, it is both rude and dangerous to try to force your way through at a higher speed. Slow down and wait until it is safe to pass, just like we expect drivers to do.

And if you find yourself bombing downhill in a dismount zone, or weaving uphill when everyone else observing the requirement to walk, you’re more than just the problem. You’re a danger to everyone else on the street — which is putting it mildly.

More still needs to be done to keep motor vehicles off the CicLAvia route. I saw many drivers pull up to the barricades and turn around after realizing the road was closed. I saw others try to inch their way past despite the walkers and riders in their way; evidently, the idea that a street could be closed to motor vehicle traffic is incomprehensible to some.

An online acquaintance set out looking for me in the massive crowd, and vice versa. Instead she met Conan O’Brian. I’d call that a significant trade-up.

Finally, after one of the most exceptionally pleasant CicLAvias yet, the October return to Downtown LA seems a very long way off, indeed.

 

Weekend Links: CicLAvia! CicLAvia! CicLAvia! And a bunch of other stuff

The view from the Downtown hub

The bike-filled view from the Downtown hub at last year’s Wilshire CicLAvia.

Do I really have to tell you CicLAvia is returning to LA this weekend?

I’m assuming that everyone within reasonable traveling distance of Los Angeles knows what CicLAvia is, and has probably been to at least one.

If not, what the hell are you waiting for?

In just three short years. CicLAvia has become the largest open streets event in the US, drawing far more than the official “over 100,000” estimate cited after each one — which was probably short by at least half for the Venice Blvd CicLAvia to the Sea. And providing Angelenos with a new way to experience the city and the streets that belong to them, not the cars that usually clog them.

The Wilshire route, which you can enjoy for free from 9 am to 4 pm this Sunday, opens up one of the city’s most iconic boulevards to people who usually grasp it only in glimpses from the hermetically sealed comfort of their cars, with events occurring all day from end to end.

It’s not a race. It’s not a bike tour. It’s not, in fact, limited to bikes, though that’s the easiest way to experience the full length from Fairfax on the Miracle Mile to the eastern terminus in Downtown LA.

It’s open to everyone, using any form of non-motorized transportation. And yes, exceptions are made for motorized wheelchairs and other necessary mobility devices.

You can experience as much or as little of the route as you want, any way you want, for however long you want. You can walk a few blocks, or hike the full way. Skate it. Scoot it. Or just pull up a chair and watch the city — your city — roll by.

Because that’s the primary takeaway most people seem to have after attending a CicLAvia. That this is our city, and our streets. And neither one belongs to the cars we’ve given them over to.

That, and it’s a helluva lot of fun.

However you do it.

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Streetsblog’s Joe Linton offers 12 tips for Sunday’s CicLAvia. I’d disagree on just one point — wear whatever the hell you want, whether that’s spandex or a taffeta tutu.

Downtown News lists nine things you’ll want to know before you join in on Sunday.

Even Zev shares the CicLAvia spirit.

Gizmodo lists CicLAvia first among nine top open streets festivals.

Feeder rides include routes from Santa Monica, UCLA and the Eastside.

Bicycle Fixation’s Rick Risemberg will be leading a free art tour of Miracle Mile galleries starting at 1 pm.

Choose from three organized walks. Or just, you know, walk.

You can meet Breaking Away’s Dennis Christopher, as well as the two-wheeled star of the movie that got me back on a bike, at the west hub near Fairfax Ave. If only bikes could sign autographs.

New Belgium Brewing is sponsoring a snapshot competition.

Los Angeles Magazine offers recommendations on where to eat and what to see, as well as a guide to churches, temples and Islamic Centers along the way.

And you’ll want to print out the Militant Angeleno’s iconic guide to the iconic boulevard to reference along the way.

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Local

Friends of fallen cyclist Andy Garcia offer a gut-wrenching remembrance of the night he was killed and two other riders seriously injured in a drunken hit-and-run. And question the plea deal that resulted in his killer serving just a fraction of the possible sentence. It’s a difficult read, but well worth it.

A cyclist offers five tips for drivers, saying our streets don’t have to be a battlefield.

Who knew LA already had a bike share program? The successful program at Occidental College could be turned into a full student service.

 

State

Streetsblog updates the status of transportation bills in Sacramento.

The husband of fallen Newport Beach cyclist Debra Deem files a claim against the city for failing to maintain the Coast Highway where she was killed; the city denies responsibility for that section of roadway, saying Caltrans should be liable.

New bike lanes are coming to Carlsbad.

After suffering a major concussion in her first spring classic, a women’s pro rider discovers it’s a long and slow way back; fortunately, she’s recovered enough to compete in this week’s Redlands Classic.

San Francisco’s bike share program could be extended to the East Bay.

 

National

Former DC and Chicago DOT head Gabe Klein looks at what makes a successful bike share program. Meanwhile, the US Senate considers a tax break for bike share.

Six new gadgets for your bike commute.

A Portland woman is arrested for intentionally running down a bike rider following a traffic dispute.

A 12-year old Oregon boy suffers a life-changing brain injury when the front wheel comes off his bike; a tragic reminder of the importance of proper maintenance, especially on low-end kids bikes that may be more prone to failure.

Wisconsin passes a watered-down vulnerable users law.

 

International

If someone on a bicycle or motorcycle can be called a biker, why shouldn’t someone in a car be called a carer? Especially one who kills an 87-year old man while driving drunk.

Cycling News remembers the forgotten founder of the Tour of Flanders.

It takes courage to race a bike. It takes real courage for women to race in Afghanistan.

Kiwi courts are accused of going easy on drivers who kill cyclists; the same argument could be made about just about any court, everywhere. An editorial from the same paper says more needs to be done to keep cyclists safe. Again, the same goes just about everywhere.

 

Finally…

Is an all-orange bike chained to a fence a clever marketing campaign, or a misguided rip-off of ghost bikes and in extremely poor taste? Personally, I’d seriously question if I’d want to do business with the company behind them.

And after a East Bay bike advocate tries switching bikes for cars in news stories, he starts a meme that quickly becomes the top trend on Twitter.

Morning Links: CicLAvia is coming, Calbike legislative agenda and the best of yesterday’s foolishness

Local

Last weekend’s successful tour of LA bike co-ops points out the need for one in Boyle Heights.

It’s coming. Signage is going up warning motorists about this Sunday’s Wilshire CicLAvia. Speaking of which, the Militant Angeleno has updated his fascinating guide to the Wilshire route, while LA Magazine looks at the churches, temples and Islamic Centers you’ll pass on the way. And Santa Monica Spoke plans a feeder ride.

Great video of a father and sleepy son sharing an 11 minute tandem ride to a Westchester nursery school. Thanks to Serge Issakov for the heads-up.

Racing for the Wolfpack Hustle team, LA’s own Jo Kelso won last weekend’s Red Hook Criterium in NYC.

A memorial will be held April 12th for fallen cyclist and former Pasadena city council member Sid Tyler.

Mark your calendar for Glendale’s Jewel City Fun and Fitness Ride on May 18th.

 

State

Calbike offers a detailed update on their legislative agenda.

A Redding bike rider was critically injured when a truck driver apparently drifted onto the wrong side of the road and hit him head-on.

 

National

Used bikes are a $2.4 billion business in the US. I’m all in favor of buying quality second-hand items; we even adopted a used dog.

An 82-year old Omaha woman faces a misdemeanor vehicular homicide charge after crossing the center line to hit and kill a cyclist riding on the opposite shoulder. She surrendered her license last week; sadly, too late to save the life of an innocent bike rider.

In an all too similar case, an 83-year old Holocaust survivor is charged in the hit-and-run collision that took a New York cyclist’s life. Every driver eventually reaches the point where they no longer belong behind the wheel; the key is recognizing it — and doing something about it — before it’s too late.

Florida police will target law-breaking group bike rides and the drivers who threaten them.

 

International

A British driver gets a well-deserved eight years for a drunken, high-speed hit-and-run.

Good advice not to aim your extra-bright lights where they could blind others on the roadway.

My Pennsylvania Dutch grandmother may have taught me to swear in German, but reading it, not so much. But I’m told this cost-benefit study of mandatory helmet laws show they don’t pencil out; in fact, benefits equaled just over 70% of costs.

 

Finally…

I’m not much on April Fools pranks online. But here are two of the better ones, as separated freeway bike lanes turn out to be the real reason for the billion dollar 405 widening, and LA’s own Pure Fix invents the first spoke-free bike wheel (unfortunately, Pure Fix has removed the page; thanks to Opus the Poet for the heads-up.)

 

Lots of news — SaMo Blvd bike lanes, CicLAvia 2014, misguided SaMo Op-Ed piece, possible Olin charges

Sold out auditorium for the recent Southern California Cycling Summit; see below.

Sold out auditorium for the recent Southern California Cycling Summit; see below.

Let’s catch up on some of the recent news.

……….

First up, Westside riders owe a big thanks to Mark Elliott of Better Bike.

Elliot has led the fight — almost single-handedly at times — to improve safety and ridability in the traditionally bike-unfriendly Biking Black Hole of Beverly Hills.

A comparison to a lone salmon swimming upstream would be putting it mildly; the mythical Sisyphus would be more apt.

Yet somehow Elliot persevered, resulting in a 1-year “pilot program” to install bike lanes on Burton Way, and bike lanes and sharrows on North Crescent Drive. While I’ve never had cause to ride Crescent, the Burton Way bike lanes have become my favored eastbound route out of the city — when I’m willing to risk my life riding through Downtown Beverly Hills to get there.

For the past year or more, Elliot has led the fight to include bike lanes on a reconstructed Santa Monica Blvd when it goes under the knife in 2015, providing a vital missing link between existing lanes in West Hollywood and Century City.

Despite overwhelming odds and the opposition of the city’s paid consultant and members of the Blue-Ribbon Committee established to study the issue, his efforts have once again carried the day, winning approval by a 9-2 vote of the committee.

Then again, the fight isn’t over yet.

The committee’s recommendation now goes to the Beverly Hills City Council for approval next month, on a date to be determined. Hopefully, we’ll get enough advance notice of the meeting to show up and voice our support.

But for the first time, it looks like we might actually get a near-continuous Santa Monica bike lane stretching from the 405 in West LA to east of La Cienga in WeHo. And we have him to thank for it.

Of course, there still are problems to be solved.

……….

Next up is the newly announced CicLAvia schedule for 2014.

This year offers three of the exceptionally popular Open Streets events, minus last year’s overly crowded CicLAvia to the Sea and the long-rumored San Fernando Valley CicLAvia. Both are promised for next year, though the former may see a reconfigured route to overcome some of the problems that resulted in near-impassible blocks of bike-congestion on Venice Blvd.

Yet even with just three events on the calendar, it looks like a strong line-up.

The Iconic Wilshire Boulevard route returns on Sunday, April 6th, once again following LA’s main street from Downtown to the Miracle Mile — although Mark Elliot has hinted that Beverly Hills might like to get in on the action. The route visits some of the city’s finest architecture and historical sites, as called out in this guide from the Militant Angeleno.

CicLAvia takes the summer off — perhaps because that Valley route fell through? — before returning with a reconfigured Heart of LA route through the Downtown area on October 5th. This year’s route extends from Echo Park to East LA, as well as traveling the length of Broadway from 9th to Chinatown, with a stop at the relatively new Grand Park.

Finally, the first holiday season CicLAvia will take place on December 7th, with its first full foray into South LA. The route will range from Leimert Park, the cultural center of the Southside, to Central Avenue, the birthplace of West Coast Jazz and home of the legendary Dunbar Hotel. Can’t wait to read the Militant’s guide to this one.

Of course, the question is, does any of this really matter?

And the answer is, of course it does. In ways that many of us, myself included, may not have realized.

LA Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne has written what may be the best and most insightful analysis of what CicLAvia is and can be. And the role it plays in transforming our city for the better.

It’s a must read.

Just don’t read the comments.

……….

On the opposite side of the coin, there’s this misguided Times opinion piece from a long-time resident of Santa Monica, who blames bikes and urban planning for all the traffic problems in the city.

In it, he laments the young urbanites who have invaded his city, while simultaneously proclaiming that the majority of the city’s 92,000 residents can’t ride bikes and live too far to walk to the city’s newly hip urban core.

So wait.

Despite the influx of moneyed young people, most city residents are too out of shape — or maybe just too lazy — to get on a bicycle? They can’t be too old, given the number of riders I know in their 70s, 80s and even 90s who somehow manage to ride on a regular basis.

And if no one can ride, where do all those casual bike riders come from?

As someone who used to work in the city over decade ago, I can testify that Santa Monica’s traffic problems existed years before more than a handful of bike lanes appeared on the street. It frequently took me over an hour to drive the 6.5 miles from my beachside office to my apartment just 6.5 miles to the east — and not because of any bikes on the streets.

And don’t even get me started on virtually impassible Lincoln Blvd, which has long been avoided by bicyclists — despite being a designated bike route — because of the heavy automotive traffic.

Then he complains about bicyclists who position themselves in traffic — “because they can!” — moments after complaining about the bike lanes that move riders safely out of the way.

For someone who claims to have lived in Santa Monica for nearly three decades, he doesn’t seem to understand the city very well.

Or urban planning, for that matter.

Or bicycling, at all.

……….

The investigation into the December 8th death of cyclist, entertainment lawyer and former Napster exec Milt Olin is nearly complete. According to the LA Times, the case will be presented to the District Attorney to determine whether charges will be filed.

The Daily News reports the Sheriff’s Deputy who killed Olin when his patrol car somehow drifted into the bike lane on Mulholland Hwy could face a charge of vehicular manslaughter, or possibly even felony manslaughter.

“Could” being the key word.

It’s also possible, if not probable, that the DA will decline to file charges based on the evidence presented by the Sheriff’s investigators. And no word on whether charges will be filed against the department if it’s found that the deputy was following policy by using the onboard computer in his patrol car while driving, as some have suggested.

And while the department has gone out of its way to stress the independence of the investigation and deny any special treatment, they have guaranteed that the results will be second guessed — no matter what they conclude — by investigating a death involving their own deputy, rather than turning it over to an outside agency such as the CHP.

……….

The Metro Board approved a motion calling on the transit agency to look into a countywide bike share program (Item 58).

While there’s no guarantee such a program will actually be approved, it could provide deep pockets to back the system, while avoiding the Balkanization caused by competing and possibly incompatible programs in various cities.

………

(L-R) Anthony Reguero, President PTE Events, Chris Carmichael, author Time-Crunched Cyclist, Rahsaan Bahati, President Bahati Foundation and Michael Bell, Oakley.

(L-R) Anthony Reguero, President PTE Events, Chris Carmichael, author Time-Crunched Cyclist, Rahsaan Bahati, President Bahati Foundation and Michael Bell, Oakley.

I received a press release this past weekend from the Bahati Foundation about the SoCal Cycling Summit 2014, held at Oakley Headquarters in Foothill Ranch, CA.

Unfortunately, I found out about it long after the January 14th event was over.

I say unfortunately because I’m a big fan of the efforts of the foundation, founded by former National Criterium champ Rahsaan Bahati, to bring the joy of bicycling to inner city youths.

And because I would have enjoyed hearing from famed cycling coach Chris Carmichael, author of The Time-Crunched Cyclist.

Summit attendees representing a diversified audience that ran the gamut– Olympic medalists, serious weekend enthusiasts as well as international competitors, filled the 400-seat amphitheater to hear Carmichael discuss his revolutionary time-crunched cyclist technique. “The SoCal Cycling Summit is a wonderful platform for our foundation to share its vision in providing assistance to inner-city youth through cycling,” said Rahsaan Bahati, founder Bahati Foundation.

“Athletes want to stay engaged in the sports they love, but it can be a difficult balance for working parents and career professionals. The time-crunched athlete program is a new approach to endurance training, one that actually takes advantage of a busy athlete’s limited training time. It’s been successful for tens of thousands of athletes, and I look forward to sharing the program with everyone at the SoCal Cycling Summit,” stated Carmichael.

Maybe next year.

………

Things aren’t looking good for long-planned bike lanes on North Figueroa Blvd, which had been approved and ready to implement until new City Councilmember Gil Cedillo appeared to throw a wrench in the works — despite his previous support for the plan.

As a result, the LACBC is calling on bike riders to contact the councilmember to express their support for the lanes, especially if you live or work in the area.

Since the candidate forum we sponsored in 2013, we have seen bike lanes installed on Colorado and the Eagle Rock bike lanes extended to Colorado.  All that is left to complete the backbone network in Northeast LA is N. Figueroa.

The residents of Northeast LA are scratching their heads thinking why haven’t they been installed yet?  After all, they were packaged for last year’s projects alongside Colorado/Eagle Rock.  This is a good opportunity to raise the question and urge Councilman Cedillo to keep his promise and install bike lanes on this very important corridor. Please join us TODAY for a day of action urging Councilmember Cedillo to add bike lanes on N. Figueroa between York and San Fernando!

Call Cedillo’s office and share your thoughts.  Dial his downtown office (213) 473-7001 and let his staffer know why you think bike lanes on N. Figueroa are good for everyone.  Then, email alek@la-bike.org and let me know how it went.  Remember to stay positive!

You can find a sample script here.

………

Finally, the CEO of Ford gets it. Even if certain residents of Santa Monica don’t.

 

Another day, another successful CicLAvia

You know it's CicLAvia when the bike sculptures come out.

You know it’s CicLAvia when the bike sculptures come out.

Maybe it was the extended hours, from 9 am to 4 pm, instead of 10 to 3.

Or maybe it was the scorching sun that made it too hot to get too worked up, and may have kept some people home for the day.

Either way, several people I talked with said this seemed to be the most relaxed CicLAvia so far.

The eighth version returned to its semi-traditional Downtown roots, and routes. Even though Downtown itself had changed, with the addition of Grand Park and the subtraction of the green bike lanes on Spring Street.

Or when the bikes parked in front of a pub take up a full block.

Or when the bikes parked in front of a pub take up a full block.

Everyone appeared to be in good spirits and ambulances seemed to be few and far between.

Although I took the afternoon shift, arriving at MacArthur Park a little after noon, so I missed anything that might have transpired prior to that.

For once, the semi-official 150,000 estimate seemed reasonably accurate; the streets I rode were nowhere near as crowded as they had been on previous events, making it more pleasant and safer for everyone involved.

On the other hand, it was heartbreaking to see the Spring Street green lane in its present state.

It was heartbreaking to see the Spring Street green lane in its present state.

Some credit for that may go to Metrolink, which evidently failed to adequately plan for a major event scheduled months in advance.

And I saw far more walkers and skaters, and less spandex, than on any previous CicLAvia. Which is a good thing, suggesting it’s moving beyond the hardcore riding crowd.

If I were to offer any constructive criticism, it would be that it’s time to stop routing riders through industrial areas with blocks of closed businesses. The South LA leg saw a fraction of the riders along the other routes, at least while I was there.

Which is not to say CicLAvia shouldn’t visit South LA. But can’t we find a more interesting way to get there, like the previous route down Figueroa?

Especially on hot days, effort has to be made to make inexpensive refreshments more easily available. I spent much of my parched ride looking for a convenient cold drink without having to stop and lock up my bike; one of the highlights was finally finding an ice cold horchata in Mariachi Plaza.

SAMSUNG

Bikes can dance, too.

And thanks to the Coke plant on Central, which placed a bucket of iced soda in the middle of the street so riders could help themselves.

Word is that next year could see four events, including another CicLAvia to the Sea — by far, the most popular event so far, at least in terms of attendance if not complaints — and a return to Wilshire Blvd, with a first foray into the Valley in December.

CicLAvia is maturing into a regular event.

In doing so, it’s losing that unique sense of wonder the first few events enjoyed, as we were all in awe the opportunity to experience an LA free from motor vehicles, and discover what the streets could be.

The view west from Mariachi Plaza.

The view west from Mariachi Plaza.

And far from what anyone could have predicted when is founders first brought the idea to the LACBC for help in getting started.

Instead, it’s becoming part of the fabric of our city. While still a revelation to those experiencing it for the first time.

But sadly, it’s only a respite, and only for a few hours.

At four pm, the barricades come down.

And the streets once again became unfriendly territory for anyone on less than four wheels.

………

A few video images from Sunday’s CicLAvia.

This is what your Spring Street green bike lane will eventually look like, even though the city broke its promise to finish it in time for CicLAvia.

Maybe it’s just me. But I loved watching this kid on his bike.

And finally, this was may favorite part of this year’s CicLAvia, as DanceLAvia took to the streets between traffic cycles with a bike-powered soundtrack.

It’s the weekend, and all links must go — CicLAvia, Spring Street and David Whiting, just to name a few

Experts say I need more photos on here. So here's a kitty sleeping in a donation bowl.

Experts say I need more photos on here. So here’s a kitty sleeping in a tip jar.

It’s been one of those weeks.

Which means a long list of bike news and links have been piling up.

And it’s the weekend, so everything must go.

Besides, it could take you until Sunday’s CicLAvia just to get through all of this.

………

You are going to be at CicLAvia this Sunday.

Right?

KPCC suggests where to go and what to do there, while Streetsblog’s Damien Newton says treat it like your first one and just go out and have fun. The Militant Angeleno offers yet another of his incredibly fascinating guides to sites along the route; seriously, download this to your smartphone and follow it along the way.

You can even have fun at CicLAvia without a bike, including dancing in the street for six hours straight.

But you might want to visit the Chinatown section first, just in case.

………

Photo of no-longer green Spring Street bike lane shamelessly stolen from Niall Huffman

Here’s one of a no-longer green Spring Street bike lane, shamelessly stolen from Niall Huffman

Meanwhile, Newton is frustrated over how long it’s taking to fix the no longer existent Spring Street bike lane along the Downtown leg of the route. LADOT promises it will be finished by Sunday’s CicLAvia; the Times says work is underway to change it from bright to dark.

And Flying Pigeon’s Josef Bray-Ali lays the blame for the whole fiasco at new Mayor Eric Garcetti’s feet.

Then there’s this comment from a rider who went through the unfinished work Friday morning.

I could cry.

So far, Spring’s got its green back… from Aliso Street to half-past Second Street. The FHWA standard “New York” Green hue leans toward blue, so I’m wondering about nighttime visibility. Even where the “green lanes” are in, the buffers aren’t painted down yet. The “cyclist” graphic that’s supposed to be centered in the lane at the approach to intersections isn’t in yet either. Discouragingly, for a stretch, the patched-over recent street work has left an unpleasant, visible lip into the bike lane. Some of the solid green areas had what looked like giant smudges, but a closer squint makes it clear that these areas only got a single slapdash layer of paint.

I wanted to kick over the stupid mocking “ROAD CLOSED SUNDAY” CicLAvia sign.

Heartbreakingly, in a few teeny spots, some of the former green peeks through like a feeble, grizzled old veteran trying desperately to hold onto glory and dignity. And failing.

………

The same rider, who prefers to remain anonymous, forwards news that I was quoted in the OC Register recently.

My coworker saved me yesterday’s paper, which includes an article by David Whiting about the new 3-foot passing law.

A brief excerpt:

Ted Rogers has a prominent voice about bicycle safety through his blog, BikingInLA.com. Despite his and other L.A. bloggers’ professed ability to figure me out because I criticize drivers and cyclists for dumb behavior, Rogers makes excellent points about weaknesses in the 3-feet law. 

“The problem is,” Rogers says, “unless a driver actually does make contact with a cyclist, the law is virtually enforceable.

“The bill includes a provision allowing drivers to pass at less than 3 feet if they slow down and pass only when it won’t endanger a cyclist’s safety. In other words, the same sort of vague, virtually unenforceable standard we have now.”

The article also references a guy who began advocate when a boy on a bike was hit in his Garden Grove neighborhood. Since Westminster is the neighboring city, my coworker and I both wondered if the boy was A.J. Brumbeck (this coworker’s brother’s neighbor’s kid), but I snooped a little and he’s not.

The giant photo that accompanied the article was of a single-file herd of MAMILs on Santiago Road. I wish the damn editor had chosen to go with a pic of anyother type of OC cyclist, maybe una pareja de invisibles riding in the gutter in Santa Ana, or a high school kid navigating her way to school on South County’s speedways, or even a beach cruiser with a wet-suited rider & a loaded surfboard rack flying down the bike lane on Golden West. Pictures are powerful, and casual readers aren’t even going to reach Whiting’s “Lance Armstrong wannabes” quote in the second column. Not to mention, Whiting says right there, “the dead aren’t just faceless road riders,” but that huge picture’s failure to show the riders’ faces knocks a big chunk of humanity out of the equation.

Editorial criticisms aside, the article itself is even, fair, and reasonable…. and hey, it quotes you!

Ride safe out there!

I’m linking back to the original column, but you know, draconian paywall and stuff.

Note to David Whiting: Thanks for the kind words, David, didn’t know you were reading. It’s not that I think I’ve got you figured out; I suspect you care about bike safety every bit as much as I do. We just disagree sometimes about who’s responsible and how to go about it.

Now, if you could just do something about that damn paywall, I’d love to get back to reading your column on a regular basis.

………

A carwash memorial will be held on Saturday in honor of Luis “Andy” Garcia, killed by a second car last month after being knocked off his bike by a hit-and-run driver.

………

LAPD is looking for the hit-and-run driver who critically injured a bike rider in Hollywood on August 6th.

Yes, August 6th.

Maybe it’s just me, but wouldn’t they have a better chance of catching the jerk if they got the word out just a little quicker?

………

Richard Masoner of Cyclelicious crunches the numbers and finds San Diego’s planned bike spending is half of what’s planned for the LA area.

………

Governor Jerry Brown approves a new law allowing undocumented immigrants to get driver’s licenses.

Regardless of what you might think about immigration issues, the new law means that there’s a much better chance the next driver who hits you might actually have insurance.

And might actually stick around afterwards.

……..

A petition calls on Caltrans to stop chip sealing routes where bicyclists ride; then again, they should assume cyclists will ride everywhere and stop chip sealing, period. Like we didn’t know this already; LA has the worst road conditions in the country. LA Times writer Nicholas Goldberg considers my suggestion that cyclists should be exempt from stop signs, and concludes, maybe not. A handful of readers respond to the Times’ Opinion page series on cycling, but why doesn’t the press ever refute the myth that we don’t pay for the roads we ride? The fate of the My Figueroa project could hinge on a hearing before the city council Transportation Committee next Wednesday. Richard Risemberg asks if LA is destroying the Glendale/Hyperion bridge in order to save it. A new DTLA development will have more bike parking than car spaces. SaMo students will participate in Bike It! Walk It! Week next week. Malibu letter writer says no to a PCH bike lane because cyclists are the spawn of Satan, more or less. An armed, off-duty Glendale PI stops a bike thief. Torrance bike thieves caught on camera. Turns out I’m not the only one to have a bee encounter, as Michael of CLR Effect feels a pinch between cheek and gum. SoCal’s Original Night Stalker was a bike rider; not to be confused with the other psycho who followed.

California’s new CEQA reform could mark the beginning of the end for auto-centric Level of Service requirements. Corona del Mar will invest in 50 new bike racks. San Diego hosts a ride to honor late local cycling legend Gordy Shields on October 25th. A cross-country cyclist has his bike stolen in San Diego. San Diego mayoral candidate rides for better bike safety, while a letter writer is critical of Critical Mass. Torrey Pines State Beach officials ban bicyclists from riding downhill; whether that’s legal depends on whether it’s considered a public or private road. Santa Barbara gets its own Open Streets — ie, ciclovia — event in November. In the wake of their non-investigation of a recent bicycling fatality, the SFPD is trying to improve relations with bicyclists, which evidently needs improving. Two-thirds of fatal SF bike and pedestrian collisions don’t result in charges. San Francisco cyclists are getting traffic signals timed so bikes get greens. Yes, it’s legal to ride a bike with your dog on a leash, but may not be smart. No bias here, as a Sacramento cyclist is fatally right hooked by a big rig truck, yet the press blames the victim for crashing into it. A Sonoma paper writes about the new three-foot law, but doesn’t seem to realize the 15 mph clause isn’t in this year’s bill.

Twenty years later, the gas tax is still stuck at 18.4 cents a gallon, which is just one reason our highways are crumbling. Smart infographic offering myths about women and cycling; on the other hand, here’s another reason women don’t ride, as femme bikes become the new push-up bra. Turns out protected bike lanes don’t have to be ugly. A Portland writer says if you get yourself killed by riding recklessly, the driver who hit you is going to feel really bad about it. A Oregon bike rider stabs the road raging driver who came after him; no word on whether he feels bad about it. One more reason not to get run down by motorists in Montana, where it just became legal to eat roadkill. At least we only have to deal with angry drivers; a Wyoming cyclist fends off a stalking cougar with bear spray. Very cool exhibit of bike photos in Denver gallery; if you’re trying to figure out what to get me for Christmas, I want the third one. Cyclists are packing guns in Houston. Do whiskey shots, run down a San Antonio cyclist and get six years in prison. St. Louis could get 100 miles of better bikeways. Michigan rider says its not if, but when you’ll kill a cyclist if you keep driving like that. A Minnesota writer questions whether bike lanes are enough. Tampa Bay pitcher David Price rides a bike share bike to Fenway Park. Goldie Hawn rides a bike in New York. The New York cabbie who took the leg of a British tourist after a road rage dispute with a cyclist is back on the streets without even a slap on the wrist. Biking across the Hudson River without benefit of a bridge. The federal government shutdown may be behind a jump in DC bike share use — including the shirtless Kiwi who followed Thursday’s fatal police pursuit. Severe bicycling injuries are up for the third year in a row at an Alabama Children’s hospital. After a Miami driver backs his SUV over a cyclist, the police do everything but pat him on the back and hang a medal around his neck.

Bike prices may fall north of the border as Canada considers scrapping an anti-dumping duty on imported bikes. A writer argues against use of the term cyclist, which I employ on a regular basis along with every other term I can think of for someone on a bike. Cyclists — there’s that word again — can commit fatal hit-and-runs, too, as a Canadian rider pleads guilty to killing a grandmother and fleeing the scene. Deliberately assault a group of Brit cyclists with your car, and walk away with no jail time. A UK cancer specialist is acquitted of killing a bike rider, despite driving on the wrong side of the road. The sister of a woman killed by a truck in London blames the victim, calling for testing of all cyclists. What happens when you buy a £137.90 — $222.89 — bike. Brit bike thief is cornered by basketball team. This is why you never go around train barricades, as a British woman is caught on video barely avoiding being crushed by a train. Wales votes to build a comprehensive network of bikeways connecting communities. The Giro could be in trouble, with up to $11 million missing from the race’s books. Call it a private bike share program — buy a $16 cup of Czech coffee, and get a free loaner bike. Sri Lankan paper says a cyclist wasn’t killed by a train, he was killed by stupidity. Despite fears, an Aussie bike lane over a bridge adds less than one minute to drivers’ commutes. A decent examination of Down Under bike rage. Road raging Kiwi driver chases down, then repeatedly attempts to run over a bike rider as he hides on the sidewalk.

Finally, when you get drunk and steal a bike, it may not be the wisest move to make your getaway by riding it down a flight of stairs. When you’re carrying pot and already wanted for violating probation, maybe riding without a light isn’t the best idea. And don’t throw your bike shoe at your wife.

Just don’t.

A successful Wilshire CicLAvia, Give Me 3 moves forward, and who knew drivers run stops signs, too?

The view from the Downtown hub

The view from the Downtown hub

Just a few quick thoughts on Sunday’s CicLAvia.

After all, there’s been more than enough written on the subject to make a review by yours truly truly irrelevant.

But let me offer my congratulations to the folks at CicLAvia for pulling off the most successful event yet.

Maybe it was the extended 9 am to 4 pm hours, allowing people to travel the route more leisurely.

It could have been using both sides of a wide boulevard, unlike the recent CicLAvia to the Sea, allowing more space to move. And the limited traffic crossings certainly didn’t hurt, making it possible for even the slowest riders to cover the entire route in an hour or so of actual pedaling.

Meanwhile, the shorter distance encouraged more walking, making this the first one where I’ve seen a significant amount of pedestrians along the entire route.

Evidently, bikes are good for business

Evidently, bikes are good for business

It might have been the iconic theme for an iconic boulevard. Along with the many entertainment and educational options along the route; the woman singing traditional Korean songs in not so traditional Koreatown was a highlight for me.

Call it Gangnam-style from a handful of centuries back.

Then there was the food of every possible description, dispensed from everything from trucks and restaurants to church groups and kids hawking cookies and lemonade.

It could have been the abundance of portapotties, reducing bladder pressure and putting everyone in better mood.

Or maybe it was all of the above, in what felt like the best planned and organized CicLAvia yet. Clearly, organizers have looked at what didn’t work in previous events and made some changes for the better.

I'll believe a car-free Wilshire when I see  unicorn on it

I’ll believe a car-free Wilshire when I see unicorns

One minor criticism is that participants universally ignored signs suggesting slower people should keep to the right, resulting in conflict zones throughout the full length of Wilshire. Which may have been why I saw three riders fall, resulting, thankfully, in relatively minor injuries.

The worst was a woman who lay in the street grabbing her collarbone, causing me to ride a few blocks back to an aid station get medical help.

The others suffered scrapes and road rash, and declined medical help.

Note to everyone: If you have the option for free medical help in an event like this, take advantage of it. Prompt first aid can prevent worse problems later, and the need for avoid more expensive medical attention if further injuries become apparent the next day, as often happens.

A friend writes that she witnessed a bike-bourn hit-and-run, in which a couple on a tandem rode off after knocking down another rider. Witnesses were unable to stop the bike before it disappeared into the crowd, leaving the victim sprawled bloody on the street.

Me taking a picture from Downtown hub; photo by Maraget Wehbi

Me taking a picture from Downtown hub; photo by Maraget Wehbi

Then there’s the schmuck — and I use the term advisedly — who apparently was unwilling to make his way to one of the four crossing points, and gunned his late model Toyota through the barricades at Windsor Ave and across the CicLAvia route, where he hit a cyclist before fleeing the scene.

Fortunately, the rider wasn’t seriously hurt, though badly shaken. (Update: The rider has three fracture vertebrae as well as a mangled bike; having suffered the same injury a few decades back, he likely faces a long road to recovery and a lifetime of back pain.)

Unfortunately, the limited description means the driver will probably get away with it.

But on the off chance they find him, I hope they take away his license. And shove it so far up his ass he’ll need to see a proctologist to buy his next six pack of beer.

………

Congratulations to Wolfpack Hustle on pulling off what I’m told was a very successful and popular first-ever Civic Center Criterium on Sunday.

………

California’s latest attempt at passing a three-foot passing law is now before the Senate Standing Committee on Transportation and Housing after overwhelmingly passing the state Assembly, just shy of a veto-proof two-thirds majority.

The bill’s sponsor, Inglewood Assemblymember Steven Bradford, has been very smart in answering the unreasonable objections Governor Jerry Brown gave in vetoing the last two attempts to pass a three-foot law.

There should be no rational reason for Brown to veto the law this time around. Although as we’ve seen, rationality isn’t exactly his strong point when it comes to bikes.

There are some strong supporters of bicycling on this committee, including West Valley Sen. Fran Pavley. But it couldn’t hurt to contact committee members to voice your support.

As we’ve seen with the previous attempts to pass this law, nothing is guaranteed in California politics.

………

After learning that the rate of cellphone violations are down in California, a writer from the Press-Enterprise conducts his own survey and finds 7.7% of drivers he observed at a Temecula intersection were texting or using handheld phones — slightly higher than state stats.

More interesting, however, was his secondary observation that two-thirds of the drivers failed to stop for the stop signs.

Based accusations from motorists, I would have sworn only bike riders do that.

Pot, meet kettle.

………

Speaking of anti-bike bias, so much for the L.A. Newspaper Group’s self-proclaimed Summer of Cycling being a good thing, as the owners of the Daily News, Daily Breeze, Press Telegram, et al, once again trot out the tired cliché of licensing cyclists and requiring insurance for bike riders.

As usually happens when the press chums for angry drivers, the results will inevitably skew towards requiring licensing for bike riders, if only because there are far more motorists than there are bicyclists. Never mind that this question reads like a classic push poll designed to draw a negative response.

So once again, for their benefit and that of anyone else unclear on the concept, like most bicyclists, I have a drivers license, which means we’ve already passed the same test as anyone else on the road — and probably have a better knowledge of traffic law than most, since we too frequently have to defend our right just to be on the road.

And despite what the papers suggest, my automotive insurance covers me for liability when I ride, as well as covering medical expenses resulting from a collision with an uninsured motorist or a solo fall.

Just like pretty much every American bike rider over the age of 16.

So get over it, already.

And before they claim to cover the subject, they need to reach out to the people and groups who are fighting for the rights of cyclists every day.

Not the angry drivers who don’t have a clue about the rights of cyclists, or how to ride a bike safely on the streets of Southern California.

………

Congratulations to our friends at LA Streetsblog, winners of two L.A. Press Club awards Sunday night.

Well deserved.

………

Former LADOT Bike Blogger and current Calbike board member Chris Kidd updates his comprehensive listing of state sidewalk riding laws, including percentages of where it’s legal in each county.

………

Looks like we’re all invited to the official inauguration ceremony for our new mayor this Sunday evening. LADOT ranks the 50 most dangerous intersections for pedestrians; something tells me they’re not much safer for anyone else. Beverly Hills begins work on the city’s first bike lanes; needless to say, they’re only being installed on a trial basis. A writer raises questions about plans to improve bicycling on Redondo Beach’s Harbor Drive. A SoCal cyclist sets a new national one-hour record at the Home Depot Center Velodrome in Carson. A Valencia woman faces charges for a hit-and-run that seriously injured a cyclist. San Diego prosecutors decide on misdemeanor charges for the driver responsible for killing cyclist Charles Gilbreth — despite recklessly passing a bus — and blame fallen cyclist David Ortiz, at least in part, for his own death.

Bikes Belong looks to reinvent itself. A smart new Maine bill redefines traffic to include bikes, bans right hooks and removes the restriction to ride to the right. NYPD is — finally — starting to take traffic fatalities seriously; thanks to Erik Griswold for the heads-up. A New York columnist offers his take on the city’s new bike share program; Gothamist says that all you got? A Virginia cyclist is hit by a stray bullet when a man can’t manage to load his gun without firing it. A Texas woman leaps off her bike at the last second to avoid getting run over by a cement truck. New Orleans gets bike lanes on iconic Esplanade Ave. One hundred nineteen years ago yesterday, a Jewish mother of three successfully set out from Boston to bike around the world.

A bike-hating Toronto writer changes his tune after just  two hours on two wheels. A Winnipeg writer offers a tongue-in-cheek look at six ways a cyclist with a death wish can become a hood ornament; decent advice, but somehow, not so funny. Bikes now make up as much as a quarter of London’s rush hour traffic. Tips for the bike curious. Even in the Netherlands, childhood bike riding is down as more parents drive their kids to school. A look back at 150 years of bicycling in Copenhagen. Evidently, you need nine lives to ride a bike.

Finally, I don’t even know what to say here, as a Swiss man sexually assaults a bicycle after puncturing both tires; presumably so it couldn’t get away, I guess. And if you’re carrying a sunglass case full of meth on your bike at 1 am, put a damn light on it, already.

The bike, that is, not the meth.

Lotsa links: Memorial rides, CicLAvia Sunday, the Summer of Cycling, and a VA bike rider says you suck

It’s been awhile since we’ve had a chance to catch up with the latest headlines.

So pop open a cold one, limber up your clicking finger and settle in for a little light reading. You’ve got to rest up for Sunday’s CicLAvia anyway, right?

………

A memorial ride will be held at 8 am Saturday in Coronado for San Diego bike racer Jackie Dunn, and a second ride will be held in Rancho Cucamonga. Now if someone will just organize rides for the other six riders who’ve lost their lives in Southern California in the past week or so.

Meanwhile, Michael Wagner of CLR Effect writes movingly about the effect Dunn’s death, and that of Chris Cono, have had on the local bike racing family.

………

KNBC-4 looks forward to Sunday’s Wilshire Blvd CicLAvia. LAist offers a guide to CicLAvia, which it calls the longest — in terms of hours, not distance — most walkable and event-filled; I prefer the jelly filled, myself. The Militant Angeleno offers his own great tour of CicLAvia sites, but  you can always settle for the official guide and/or podcast initiated by the Getty, whatever that means. One of those Wilshire Blvd sites is the famed Gaylord apartments, built by the boulevard’s socialist capitalist namesake. Take a bike train from the Tar Pits to the Wolfpack Crit. The Bikerowave will be closed for CicLAvia on Sunday.

And Forbes says CicLAvia is turning L.A. into a city of pedestrians.

As for me, I’ll be working the LACBC booth at the Downtown hub at One Wilshire from 10 am to noon on Sunday; stop by and say hi if you’re in the area.

………

The LA Daily News declares this the summer of cycling, but not necessarily in a good way. But what’s with this whole “bike lobby” crap that’s suddenly popping up everywhere since the wicked witch of Wall Street’s mad rant? Thanks to LACBC board member April Economides for the link.

………

It looks like West Hollywood is serious about updating its bicycle and pedestrian plan; the West Hollywood Bicycle Coalition says things are moving forward.

Seriously, the WHBC is an amazing group of bike advocates working hard to make WeHo a safer and more ridable city; if you live or bike in the city, you owe it to yourself to join.

………

A bicyclist is looking for witnesses to a hit-and-run at Washington and Pacific in Venice this past Tuesday. Get a free peach if you bike valet today at the SaMo farmers market. If you’ve had a bike stolen in Santa Monica lately, the SMPD wants to get it back to you today. As Santa Monica police prepare to focus on ticketing bike riders, city officials focus on safety in the face of rising cycling rates; maybe they’re playing good cop, bad cop? The Times looks at outgoing city councilmember Bill Rosendahl; he’s been the role model for what an elected official should be. LACBC recounts the recent Climate Ride. LADOT welcomes two new assistant bike program coordinators. A new park opens along the L.A. River bike path. A new Watts bike co-op is put on hold until the owner gets back from his deployment in Afghanistan. In the wake of the collision that killed fallen bike rider Phillip O’Neill, Boyonabike examines the proposed Pasadena bike plan and finds it lacking. Santa Clarita is looking for artists to design new bike racks. Long Beach gets approval for separate bike and pedestrian paths on the beach.

San Diego will install sensors to lengthen red lights to give cyclists time to get across major intersections. Orange County’s cdmCyclist talks to two of my favorite people and bike advocates. A new Riverside bridge offers safe passage to bicyclists and pedestrians on the north side; on the south, not so much. Turns out bike lanes make things better for everyone; except Hollywood filmmakers, of course. SFist starts a — hopefully tongue-in-cheek — sidewalk riding offender registry. A Stockton rider is hit by a pickup, then beaten with baseball bats by the occupants. Watsonville wants to be the new Bike City USA. Now that’s a bad fall, as a Marin County man falls off a bike trail and lands butt first on a piece of rebar. When it comes to infrastructure, a little effective signage might help; personally, I want to post the last one facing against traffic all over L.A.

Elly Blue says the secret to riding in high heels is there is no secret. Lance wants the rest to the cycling world to come clean. A new record in the Race Across America (RAAM). The latest gear for bike cops. Seattle claims to have the world’s best naked bike ride. Skaters beat up a Seattle bike rider after making him fall. Bike to Work Day comes on Wednesday in my home town. A Colorado highway gets a $312 million upgrade, including a bike path. Kansas City Star says someone just needs to tell motorists bike lanes are a good thing. Minneapolis ridership is up, but crashes remain steady — there’s still room for improvement, though. Lady, if a Chicago bike rider travelling at world-class speed really ran right over your dog, he’d probably be dead — and so would the cyclist. A Maine bicyclist gets sucked under the wheels of a passing semi, and police fall over themselves to blame the victim. Leonardo DiCaprio and friend go riding in New York. Gothamist writes in defense of salmon cycling. AARP comes out strongly in support of a Federal Complete Streets bill. Businesses along a new bike trail in Greenville SC saw a 30-50% increase in sales. A Florida driver offers a bike rider $14 for a cab before fleeing the scene after running her down. Now that LeBron has a second ring, can the bike-riding NBA star fix the streets of Miami?

How to cycle up an impossibly high cliff to increase ridership. Guardian readers offer tips for touring France by bike. The New York Times complains Amsterdam suffers from too many bikes; nice problem to have. UK bike bloggers say the bike industry should spend less on press trips and more on advocacy. Bikes are making a comeback in traffic-clogged Bangladesh.

Finally, if you’re being attacked by buzzards, maybe you need to ride a little faster. A Virginia letter writer says I’m okay but you suck, as he draws an artificial distinction between bike riders like him and those damned cyclists. And if this reminder to get on your bike doesn’t make you smile, you may be beyond hope.

In the mad dash between various meetings, writing for Streetsblog and trying to keep up this site this week, I’m afraid I’ve lost track of who sent me what links this time.

So my apologies if I don’t give credit where it’s due for forwarding stories; trust me, I do appreciate it and I’ll try to do a better job next time.

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